Bijoux Couture: Bijoux textiles, perles et matières by Céline Poncet, Véronique Vuillemin, Sandrine Guédon,

By Céline Poncet, Véronique Vuillemin, Sandrine Guédon, Virginie Guyot

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The Unified Process for Practitioners: Object-Oriented Design, UML and Java

Unified approach for Practitioners publications the reader by using the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and the Unified technique, and their software to Java platforms. It offers an simply available, step-by-step consultant to utilizing UML and the Unified approach. the 1st half offers a realistic advent to item orientated research and layout utilizing the Unified method.

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R) { delete clanger; // Again, delete clanger to prevent a leak User::Leave(r); } ... // Omitted for clarity delete clanger; } When a leave occurs, local variables are destroyed without first freeing any resources they own. The resource becomes unrecoverable, causing a memory leak, and is said to be ”orphaned”. h: class CleanupStack { public: IMPORT_C static void PushL(TAny* aPtr); IMPORT_C static void PushL(CBase* aPtr); IMPORT_C static void PushL(TCleanupItem anItem); IMPORT_C static void Pop(); IMPORT_C static void Pop(TInt aCount); IMPORT_C static void PopAndDestroy(); IMPORT_C static void PopAndDestroy(TInt aCount); IMPORT_C static void Check(TAny* aExpectedItem); inline static void Pop(TAny* aExpectedItem); inline static void Pop(TInt aCount, TAny* aLastExpectedItem); inline static void PopAndDestroy(TAny* aExpectedItem); inline static void PopAndDestroy(TInt aCount, TAny* aLastExpectedItem); }; Objects that are not otherwise leave-safe should be placed on the cleanup stack before calling code that may leave.

Two well-documented exceptions are the kernel-side driver classes and the heap descriptor (HBufC), which is discussed further in Chapter 5. This doesn’t mean that the code is wrong – in many cases there are good reasons why they do not fit the theory. In the lower-level code, in particular, you’ll find cases which may have been written before the name conventions were fully established or which, for efficiency reasons, have different characteristics and behavior. Whenever you come across a new class, it’s worth comparing it to the rules above to see if it fits and, if not, considering why it doesn’t.

This is known as two-phase construction, and is described further in Chapter 4. USING THE CLEANUP STACK 31 { delete clanger; // delete clanger to prevent a leak User::Leave(r); // leave with the same error... horrible! =r) { delete clanger; // Again, delete clanger to prevent a leak User::Leave(r); } ... // Omitted for clarity delete clanger; } When a leave occurs, local variables are destroyed without first freeing any resources they own. The resource becomes unrecoverable, causing a memory leak, and is said to be ”orphaned”.

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