A Byte of Python 1.92 by Swaroop C. H.

By Swaroop C. H.

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Py", line 12, in print(total(10, 1, 2, 3)) TypeError: total() needs keyword-only argument vegetables How It Works: Declaring parameters after a starred parameter results in keyword-only arguments. If these arguments are not supplied a default value, then calls to the function will raise an error if the keyword argument is not supplied, as seen above. If you want to have keyword-only arguments but have no need for a starred parameter, then simply use an empty star without using any name such as def total(initial=5, *, vegetables).

Oldid=2371 Contributors: Swaroop, 7 anonymous edits 61 Python en:Data Structures Python en:Data Structures Introduction Data structures are basically just that - they are structures which can hold some data together. In other words, they are used to store a collection of related data. There are four built-in data structures in Python - list, tuple, dictionary and set. We will see how to use each of them and how they make life easier for us. e. you can store a sequence of items in a list. This is easy to imagine if you can think of a shopping list where you have a list of items to buy, except that you probably have each item on a separate line in your shopping list whereas in Python you put commas in between them.

Changing the Order Of Evaluation To make the expressions more readable, we can use parentheses. For example, 2 + (3 * 4) is definitely easier to understand than 2 + 3 * 4 which requires knowledge of the operator precedences. As with everything else, the parentheses should be used reasonably (do not overdo it) and should not be redundant (as in 2 + (3 + 4)). There is an additional advantage to using parentheses - it helps us to change the order of evaluation. For example, if you want addition to be evaluated before multiplication in an expression, then you can write something like (2 + 3) * 4.

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